During maternity leave, new parents quickly learn to expect the unexpected. No matter how well we plan, we have to adapt to changes in plans when our new bundle of joy is in charge of the household for those first few chaotic months. Planning for obstacles applies to returning to work after our maternity leave is up too, though there are steps we can take to make the transition back to the professional environment a little easier. 

 resume writing after maternity leave

Emotions.

No matter how meticulously you’ve planned for the day when you return to work, and even if you’re looking forward to it, you may feel sad to leave your baby. You might feel guilty about leaving your baby in someone else’s care, while at the same time you might experience relief at getting away from the baby’s needs for a while. These conflicting, rollercoaster emotions are all very normal and natural. You can expect to have plenty of these mixed feelings for quite some time in varying degrees whether you’re the mom or the dad.

 

Lists.

If you weren’t a “list person” before, now you need to become one! You should have a list of short-term daily to-do tasks as well as weekly and monthly ones. You’re going to be much busier than you ever imagined, and lists will help you stay organized as well as keeping your tasks in the desired priority. You should also have an emergency phone number list for your child-care person, and a list of items you need to bring with you each day, if child care is outside your home. Don’t think of lists as creating more work; they will make you feel less overwhelmed once they exist.

If you weren’t a “list person” before, now you need to become one! You should have a list of short-term daily to-do tasks as well as weekly and monthly ones. You’re going to be much busier than you ever imagined, and lists will help you stay organized as well as keeping your tasks in the desired priority. You should also have an emergency phone number list for your child-care person, and a list of items you need to bring with you each day, if child care is outside your home. Don’t think of lists as creating more work; they will make you feel less overwhelmed once they exist. 

 

Support.

Don’t be afraid to talk about your baby at work. You’re probably not the only parent, and other parents will likely have good advice for you. If you’re lucky, there might even be other new parents, and you can bond with them. If you can, bring your baby in for a visit before you officially start back to work, so everyone can say hello. While you want to be regarded as a professional, you’re also a parent now, and you can wear both hats. There will likely come a day you need to take off work for an appointment regarding your child, and it will be great for everyone to know his/her name, since you’ve already integrated him/her into your social conversations.

Routine.

Routine is more important now than ever, for you, your co-parent, your baby, and your coworkers. Practice a trial run of your commute before your back to work start date, including all your child care arrangements. Pack up your baby and his/her supplies and drive to your child care provider at the time you would if you were planning to head to work on time. Give about fifteen minutes to settle in your baby and say your goodbyes and resume your commute to the office. How long did that take on your pretend day? Did you forget anything? Do a quick check to make sure.

Relaxation.

You remember this word from your previous life? It’s still important, perhaps more now than ever. Your weekdays are going to be hectic with you and your co-parent caring for your baby before and after work. And somehow getting a full day’s work done every day Monday through Friday. There’s dinner, maybe some light housework, preparing for the next day, trying to get your baby to sleep, etc. But what about weekends? Like most parents, you’ll try to do as many chores as possible, please all your relatives with visits, catch up with friends, shop the sales, etc. But you must take time for yourself, to relax and rest, or you’ll quickly burn out from this exhausting routine. Remember to put your own oxygen mask on first. It’s crucial.

If you need your resume spruced up before you return to work after maternity leave, contact Resume Advisor today, and get in touch with a resume writer.

 

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